September302014
remainaloft:

Felt creative and came up with this move I affectionately called the Back Breaker! #cerceau #lyra #aerialhoop #aerials #aerialist #flexibility #contortion #aerialcontortion #bendy #strength #circus #circuseverydamnday #cirque

remainaloft:

Felt creative and came up with this move I affectionately called the Back Breaker! #cerceau #lyra #aerialhoop #aerials #aerialist #flexibility #contortion #aerialcontortion #bendy #strength #circus #circuseverydamnday #cirque

(via inversionaddict)

4PM
ifpaintingscouldtext:

Edgar Degas | L’Absinthe | 1876 

this is now my favorite tumblr. 

ifpaintingscouldtext:

Edgar Degas | L’Absinthe | 1876 

this is now my favorite tumblr. 

2PM
meowmeowroar:

Anna Ra - Innsbruck, Austria

meowmeowroar:

Anna Ra - Innsbruck, Austria

(Source: loopinglunar, via inversionaddict)

12PM
heaveninawildflower:

Floral Study (Lilacs) by Antoine Berjon (1754-1843).
Image and text courtesy MFA Boston

heaveninawildflower:

Floral Study (Lilacs) by Antoine Berjon (1754-1843).

Image and text courtesy MFA Boston

(via scientificillustration)

September292014
medicalschool:

Infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and arteriosclerosis

medicalschool:

Infrarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and arteriosclerosis

(Source: farm7.staticflickr.com)

6PM
allthecanadianpolitics:

Lyme disease surges north: Canada moves out of denial

Vett Lloyd saved the tick that latched onto her while she was gardening outside her home in New Brunswick, Canada, in 2011. A biologist who specialized in cancer genetics, she plucked the blood-sucking creature from her skin and sent it to the local public-health office to have it tested for the dangerous bacteria she knew it could carry.
But officials told her not to worry, Lloyd said. Lyme disease was exceedingly rare in the forested maritime province northeast of Maine. The tick was tossed untested.
The next year brought agony: fatigue, fevers that would come and go, aching joints, and, finally, trouble lifting her arms or walking. 
Lloyd indeed had Lyme disease, but as with many Canadians felled by the tick-borne illness, her diagnosis and treatment were delayed because of a system slow to acknowledge that public-health risks were changing as the climate warmed. In a concession that many patients say is overdue, Canadian authorities now admit that the most common vector-borne disease in the United States is an “emerging” threat north of the border.
"It’s living hell," Lloyd said of her experience with Lyme. "Every day you wake up with less of your body working….You are desperately sick, and then you have to fight for care."
Suffering longer
Lloyd is lucky. She knew she had been bitten by a tick and eventually insisted on treatment with antibiotics. After a “two-year journey”, she is well now.
Other Canadians have suffered longer, without a clue what was ailing them. Just east of New Brunswick, at a clinic in Halifax, Nova Scotia, rheumatologists over the past four years saw an unusual run of 17 children, ranging in age from 2 to 15, with suspected arthritis—four cases so severe the children had been to the emergency room, and two cases that were treated as septic. In only one case had doctors correctly diagnosed the underlying problem: Lyme disease.

Continue Reading.

allthecanadianpolitics:

Lyme disease surges north: Canada moves out of denial

Vett Lloyd saved the tick that latched onto her while she was gardening outside her home in New Brunswick, Canada, in 2011. A biologist who specialized in cancer genetics, she plucked the blood-sucking creature from her skin and sent it to the local public-health office to have it tested for the dangerous bacteria she knew it could carry.

But officials told her not to worry, Lloyd said. Lyme disease was exceedingly rare in the forested maritime province northeast of Maine. The tick was tossed untested.

The next year brought agony: fatigue, fevers that would come and go, aching joints, and, finally, trouble lifting her arms or walking. 

Lloyd indeed had Lyme disease, but as with many Canadians felled by the tick-borne illness, her diagnosis and treatment were delayed because of a system slow to acknowledge that public-health risks were changing as the climate warmed. In a concession that many patients say is overdue, Canadian authorities now admit that the most common vector-borne disease in the United States is an “emerging” threat north of the border.

"It’s living hell," Lloyd said of her experience with Lyme. "Every day you wake up with less of your body working….You are desperately sick, and then you have to fight for care."

Suffering longer

Lloyd is lucky. She knew she had been bitten by a tick and eventually insisted on treatment with antibiotics. After a “two-year journey”, she is well now.

Other Canadians have suffered longer, without a clue what was ailing them. Just east of New Brunswick, at a clinic in Halifax, Nova Scotia, rheumatologists over the past four years saw an unusual run of 17 children, ranging in age from 2 to 15, with suspected arthritis—four cases so severe the children had been to the emergency room, and two cases that were treated as septic. In only one case had doctors correctly diagnosed the underlying problem: Lyme disease.

Continue Reading.

(via mindblowingscience)

4PM
2PM
happyhealthybrunette:

along with eyebrow gods, my dear <3

happyhealthybrunette:

along with eyebrow gods, my dear <3

(Source: lexlifts)

12PM
September282014
missdrusilla:

Joana Silva shot by John Diaz (x)

missdrusilla:

Joana Silva shot by John Diaz (x)

(via hotcircus)

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